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Do You Know the Amendments to the US Constitution?


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According to Article V of the Constitution, an amendment must either be proposed by Congress with a two-thirds majority vote in both the House of Representatives and the Senate or by a constitutional convention called for by two-thirds of state legislatures. Either way, a proposed amendment only becomes part of the Constitution when ratified by legislatures or conventions in three-fourths of the states (38 of 50 states). The First 10 Amendments to the Constitution The first 10 of these amendments are known as the Bill of Rights Proposed on September 25, 1789; Adopted on December 15, 1791. These were added in 1791 and are about personal and individual rights. The additional 11–27 were adopted as needed. Amendment IProposed by Congress on September 25, 1789. Ratified December 15, 1791. Rights to Religion, Speech, Press, Assembly, Petition


Amendment II Proposed by Congress on September 25, 1789. Ratified December 15, 1791. The right of the people to keep and bear arms.


Amendment IIIProposed by Congress on September 25, 1789. Ratified December 15, 1791. No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house without consent.


Amendment IV — Proposed by Congress on September 25, 1789. Ratified December 15, 1791. The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures.


Amendment V — Proposed by Congress on September 25, 1789. Ratified December 15, 1791. Right to Grand Jury, no double Jeopardy or self-incrimination, and Due Process


Amendment VI Proposed by Congress on September 25, 1789. Ratified December 15, 1791. Rights of Accused in Criminal Prosecutions: Rights to Jury Trial, to Confront Opposing Witnesses, and to Counsel


Amendment VII Proposed by Congress on September 25, 1789. Ratified December 15, 1791. The right of trial by jury.


Amendment VIII Proposed by Congress on September 25, 1789. Ratified December 15, 1791. Protections against excessive bail, cruel and unusual punishment


Amendment IX Proposed by Congress on September 25, 1789. Ratified December 15, 1791. The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.


Amendment XProposed by Congress on September 25, 1789. Ratified December 15, 1791. The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States, or to the people.


AMENDMENTS 11–27 AMENDMENT XIPassed by Congress on March 4, 1794. Ratified February 7, 1795. The Judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law against a state. AMENDMENT XII Passed by Congress on December 9, 1803. Ratified June 15, 1804. Directions of Election of President and Vice-President AMENDMENT XIII Passed by Congress on January 31, 1865. Ratified December 6, 1865. Abolition of Slavery and Involuntary Servitude AMENDMENT XIV — Passed by Congress on June 13, 1866. Ratified July 9, 1868. Protects rights against state infringements, defines citizenship, prohibits states from interfering with privileges and immunities, requires due process and equal protection, punishes states for denying vote, and disqualifies Confederate officials and debts AMENDMENT XV — Passed by Congress on February 26, 1869. Ratified February 3, 1870. The voting right of citizens of the United States shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. AMENDMENT XVI — Passed by Congress on July 2, 1909. Ratified February 3, 1913. Congress shall have the power to collect taxes on incomes. AMENDMENT XVII — Passed by Congress on May 13, 1912. Ratified April 8, 1913. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, elected by the people for six years. AMENDMENT XVIII — Passed by Congress on December 18, 1917. Ratified January 16, 1919. Repealed by amendment 21. Prohibition of alcohol in the United States. AMENDMENT XIX — Passed by Congress on June 4, 1919. Ratified August 18, 1920. Women’s right to vote AMENDMENT XX — Passed by Congress on March 2, 1932. Ratified January 23, 1933. The terms of the President and the Vice President shall end at noon on the 20th day of January, and the terms of Senators and Representatives at noon on the 3d day of January and establishes the Commencement of Presidential Term and Succession AMENDMENT XXI — Passed by Congress on February 20, 1933. Ratified December 5, 1933. Repeal of 18th Amendment (Prohibition) AMENDMENT XXII — Passed by Congress on March 21, 1947. Ratified February 27, 1951. Two-Term Limitation on President AMENDMENT XXIII — Passed by Congress on June 16, 1960. Ratified March 29, 1961. The District of Columbia shall participate in Presidential Vote AMENDMENT XXIV — Passed by Congress August 27, 1962. Ratified January 23, 1964. Abolition of Poll Tax Requirement in Federal Elections AMENDMENT XXV — Passed by Congress on July 6, 1965. Ratified February 10, 1967. In case of the removal of the President from office or of his death or resignation, the Vice President shall become President. Whenever there is a vacancy in the office of the Vice President, the President shall nominate a Vice President who shall take office upon confirmation by a majority vote of both Houses of Congress. AMENDMENT XXVI — Passed by Congress on March 23, 1971. Ratified July 1, 1971. Right to Vote at Age 18 AMENDMENT XXVII — Proposed by Congress on September 25, 1789. Ratified May 7, 1992. Congressional Compensation Since the Constitution was ratified in 1789, hundreds of thousands of bills have been introduced attempting to amend it. But only 27 amendments to the U.S. Constitution have been ratified, out of 33 passed by Congress and sent to the states.


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